retrench


retrench
retrench re‧trench [rɪˈtrentʆ] verb [intransitive] formal FINANCE ECONOMICS
if a company, industry, or government retrenches, it spends less money:

• Defense companies are retrenching and have scaled back orders.

— retrenchment noun [countable, uncountable] :

• No sooner had he taken office when he announced a savage program of retrenchment and deflation.

• a drastic retrenchment plan

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retrench UK US /ˌriːˈtrentʃ/ verb
[I] MANAGEMENT, FINANCE if governments, companies, etc. retrench, they start spending less money, or reducing costs: »

Some large corporate R&D departments have retrenched.

»

It's time to retrench and refocus on our key brands.

»

The company retrenched and cut staff in the face of the impending downturn.

[T] Australian English HR, WORKPLACE to remove a worker from their job as a way of reducing costs: »

With the level of unemployment already so high, the thought of approximately 10,000 workers being retrenched is difficult to bear.

See also LAY SB OFF(Cf. ↑lay sb off)

Financial and business terms. 2012.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Retrench — Re*trench , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retrenched}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retrenching}.] [OF. retrenchier, F. retrancher; pref. re re + OF. trenchier, F. trancher, to cut. See {Trench}.] 1. To cut off; to pare away. [1913 Webster] Thy exuberant parts… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Retrench — Re*trench , v. i. To cause or suffer retrenchment; specifically, to cut down living expenses; as, it is more reputable to retrench than to live embarrassed. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • retrench — I verb abridge, be economical, be frugal, circumcidere, clip, confine, contrahere, curtail, cut, cut down, cut short, decrease, deduct, delete, diminish, economize, lessen, limit, lop, pare, pinch, practice economy, prune, reduce, reduce expenses …   Law dictionary

  • retrench — 1590s, dig a new trench as a second line of defense, from Fr. retrencher to cut off, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) + O.Fr. trenchier to cut. Sense of cut down, reduce (expenses, etc.) is from 1620s …   Etymology dictionary

  • retrench — curtail, abridge, *shorten, abbreviate Analogous words: *decrease, lessen, reduce, diminish …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • retrench — ► VERB 1) reduce costs or spending in response to economic difficulty. 2) chiefly Austral. make (an employee) redundant in order to reduce costs. 3) formal reduce or diminish. DERIVATIVES retrenchment noun. ORIGIN French retrancher cut out …   English terms dictionary

  • retrench — [rē trench′] vt. [MFr retrencher: see RE & TRENCH] 1. to cut down or reduce (esp. expenses); curtail 2. to cut off or out; omit or delete vi. to reduce expenses; economize …   English World dictionary

  • retrench — UK [rɪˈtrentʃ] / US verb Word forms retrench : present tense I/you/we/they retrench he/she/it retrenches present participle retrenching past tense retrenched past participle retrenched 1) [intransitive] to reduce costs or the amount that you… …   English dictionary

  • retrench — [16] Retrench originally meant literally ‘dig a new trench as a second line of defence’. It was borrowed from early modern French retrencher, a descendant of Old French retrenchier. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix re ‘again’ and… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • retrench — [16] Retrench originally meant literally ‘dig a new trench as a second line of defence’. It was borrowed from early modern French retrencher, a descendant of Old French retrenchier. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix re ‘again’ and… …   Word origins